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helen-louise
baratron
baratron
Short Stories I enjoyed in other Mammoth Books of Best New SF (post 1)
This one'll have 12, 13 & 15. I've posted 14 & 16 already, and haven't looked at 17 & 18 yet. I suppose I'm going to have to repeat this exercise with The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror series too, oh no! *hand --> staple --> forehead*.

The Mammoth Book of Best New SF 12 - ed. Gardner Dozois
This was the first Mammoth Book of Best New SF that I bought. I got it to read on the plane on the way to alt.polycon 6 :) Took that book and my Game Boy Color on the flight, iirc. I think we owned one laptop between us at the time, and we certainly didn't take it to Canada.

  • Oceanic - Greg Egan. The first story in this book, and this one just spoke to me. Something about the science vs religion theme. I used to be very conventionally religious, and then I stopped being so conventionally religious while still believing in the same core things I always did. Also, I loved this world's way round same-sex relationships.
  • Jedella Ghost - Tanith Lee. Yet another story where I wonder about the SF vs fantasy borders, while enjoying reading it greatly.
  • The Island of the Immortals - Ursula K. Le Guin. So depressing! And a take on immortality that I hadn't considered before. Stories about immortality usually make you have to think about whether it would be a good or a bad thing, but the **MASSIVE SPOILER** of this situation was so... bleak.
  • Sea Change, With Monsters - Paul J. McAuley. Even the name of this story is awesome, and I loved the setting.
  • Divided by Infinity - Robert Charles Wilson. The story started out normally enough and then went somewhere very weird. I'm not sure where the last part came from (mmm, delicious drugs?), but I'm glad I read it.
  • The Cuckoo's Boys - Robert Reed. I really liked it. It's about a mentor with students, except that all of the students are clones of the same person, who is **MASSIVE SPOILER**. And there is a part where he's explaining trophic levels to a student based on the idea of eighth-graders eating seventh-graders, and it's so gross and funny that I've never forgotten it.
  • The Halfway House at the Heart of Darkness - William Browning Spencer. About the MMORPGs of the future that are jacked directly into your body, and addiction, and recovery.
  • The Very Pulse of the Machine - Michael Swanwick. Bizarre and creepy with an entirely uncertain ending, very similar to the end of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Broke my brain slightly. It did not feature bad science, however.
  • Story of Your Life - Ted Chiang. Oh my gods. Science and linguistics and human relationship stuff. I don't know if this is my favourite story ever, but it's in the top 10. Explains why I am the way I am about spoilers (i.e. that there is no such thing - knowing how a story ends does not diminish my enjoyment of it. If anything, it enhances it.)
  • Unborn Again - Chris Lawson. Prions and zombies. BRAINZ.
  • La Cenerentola - Gwyneth Jones. Lesbians with children that are genetically both of theirs, and SO CREEPY.
  • Free in Asveroth - Jim Grimsley. Depressing as hell, but in a way that makes you glad that you don't live in that world.
  • The Summer Isles - Ian R. MacLeod. Alternative history fiction set in an alternative version of 1940s Britain (although I actually thought it was later, more like an alternative 1950s or 60s). With a twist that I wasn't expecting at all.

    Meh, it's stupid o'clock and am too tired to continue with this now. Will do 13 & 15 some other time.

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