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some of my health is not crap! - helen-louise — LiveJournal
baratron
baratron
some of my health is not crap!
I meant to post the results of my blood tests, seeing as I got them on Friday. Apparently my liver function is all well in the middle of the normal range (I've forgotten the exact number). My TSH is within the range of normal, but somewhat on the high side - mine is 3.81 uIU/mL and the normal range is 0.4 - 4.0 uIU/mL. This means that I do not have hypothyroidism yet, but probably will within the next 20 years. Yay :/ But the reason I wanted it measured was to find out where it was because I suspect I'm likely to become hypothyroid later, so it wasn't a surprise.

My cholesterol level is great. My LDL ("bad" cholesterol) is 1.7 mmol/L, and the target value is less than 3 mmol/L. My HDL ("good" cholesterol) was 2.4 mmol/L, and apparently is super awesome! A desirable level of HDL is greater than 1.0 mmol/L and is associated with average risk of heart disease. A good level of HDL is 1.5 mmol/L or more and is associated with a less than average risk of heart disease. Also, you have a lower risk of heart disease if HDL is more than 20% of the total cholesterol level, and my HDL is 58.5% of the total!

Admittedly, this isn't the most exciting news in the world ever. I mean, I've been vegan since 2005, and the only significant plant source of cholesterol is avocado [1], which I don't eat. I also eat vast quantities of soya, and soy protein supposedly lowers "bad" cholesterol. Nonetheless, it's pretty cool, because 80% of gallstones are made of cholesterol, and lower cholesterol levels may reduce your chances of getting them again.

[1] iirc. Wikipedia is being entirely unhelpful on the subject at the moment, as the current entry on cholesterol manages to claim both "Plants have trace amounts of cholesterol, so even a vegan diet, which includes no animal foods, can have a high amount of cholesterol depending on the diet and oils used." and "For example, to ingest the amount of cholesterol in one egg yolk, one would need to ingest about 9.6 litres (2.1 imp gal/2.5 US gal) of pure peanut oil." Now, one egg yolk is something that many omnivores eat every day or every other day, but I seriously doubt there's a vegan on the planet who ingests 9.6 litres of peanut oil in a day! I think someone with a clue needs to edit that.

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Comments
geminigirl From: geminigirl Date: 18th August 2008 22:54 (UTC) (Link)
I know in the US, the more current guideline is to treat as hypothyroid at 3.04 or higher, or if there are symptoms. In fact, the lab results I got back gives the normal range and the disclaimer "Normal values do not rule out the possibility of sub-clinincal hypothyroism."

I'm lucky-I've had sub-clinical numbers and a doctor willing to treat aggressively. It's made a huge difference.
baratron From: baratron Date: 18th August 2008 23:05 (UTC) (Link)
They're a little more cautious here - I think because being on thyroxine means you get free prescriptions for life. Also, I don't noticeably have any of the symptoms; except for weight gain, which has at least partially been explained by mirtazapine. Not like my poor mother who still experiences way too many of the symptoms despite being on the "right" level of thyroxine :/

I need to look into how carbamazepine causes "abnormal thyroid hormone tests" (not abnormal thyroid hormone levels) because clearly I need to keep getting my thyroid tested every couple of years, or if I suddenly notice that I have several symptoms. Am hoping it's simple enough to deal with, or they can do a carbamazepine level test to normalise the numbers.
brooksmoses From: brooksmoses Date: 18th August 2008 23:35 (UTC) (Link)
Indeed; I was going to comment on that, since suzanne has hypothyroidism and is a bit of an evangelist for frequent testing and such. From what I gather, there seems to be a fair range there that amounts to "may be hypothyroidism, depending on whether symptoms are shown".

Not that long ago, the U.S. numbers were 5-something (IIRC), and apparently some labs/doctors are still using that as the cutoff.
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